Posts tagged "comics"
first signed copy! #angiebongiolati #secretacres #comics  (at Bergen Street Comics)

first signed copy! #angiebongiolati #secretacres #comics (at Bergen Street Comics)

housingworksbookstore:

This Week at HWBC:
Thank you to everyone who came out to Downtown Literary Festival at Housing Works and McNally Jackson yesterday! We had a great turnout and a lot of lovely events. Stay tuned for a podcast with some of the highlights later this week!

As we unwind from #DLF, here’s a look at what’s going on this week:

Tonight, Theatre of the Oppressed NYC and Housing Works present the 13 Theatre Troupe in The Just-Us System. Join the troupe for a theatrical brainstorming on the topics of criminal justice, domestic abuse, and more.

Tomorrow come see Love and RocketsGilbert Hernandez launch his new Drawn & Quarterly semi-autobiographical graphic novel Marble Season.

Then on Thursday The Moth StorySLAM returns to Housing Works, this time with the theme “Mystery.”

Finally, come hang out Friday with some drink specials and good books for our weekly happy hour The Slush Pile.

me & my out of town guest are going to see Gilbert Hernandez tonight! come see bout me/us if you like well-dressed queer latinas who love all of los bros.

(via fyloveandrockets)

edchoyblog:

First Take Funnies: self-portrait, No Exaggeration.
note: I stole the title FTF from Frank Santoro. So Frank, if you see this and you’d rather I not, tell me.

I like this a lot. It’s simple and awesome. dang.

edchoyblog:

First Take Funnies: self-portrait, No Exaggeration.

note: I stole the title FTF from Frank Santoro. So Frank, if you see this and you’d rather I not, tell me.

I like this a lot. It’s simple and awesome. dang.

edchoyblog:

above is a higher-quality* version of a preview of “Roosterlegs” by Sam Sharpe and me. 

it appears in the anthology Little Heart from 2D Cloud. you can pre-order it at its kickstarter. there’s 7 days left and a ways to go until it gets funded, so if you want one, now’s your chance. the book stars kate craig & emily carroll, michael deforge, noah vansciver, tim sievert, luke holden, anna bongiovanni, sally bloodbath madden, and many others, with a drawing by zak sally. gifts for pledges at different levels include a risograph prints by me; a silkscreened gender-neutral bathroom sign by one of my favorite cartoonists, edie fake; 4 silkscreened cards by sally madden; and a date with an artist (your choice, duh), including me or noah vansciver.

here’s a short interview about the project conducted by raighne hogan. here’s a snippet:

Why is marriage equality important to you?

Marriage equality is an obvious equal rights issue. Changes in the legal language change perception, and self-perception, of gay people. Though I’m not a big fan of the institution of marriage, it’s important for partners to be able to make this choice and have legal rights.

That said, I wish the national conversation about gayness was not narrowly focused on gay marriage, bullying, and gays in the military. I think of the tunnel vision focus on them as a palliative, leading us away from talking about deeper and vastly more harmful institutionalized prejudices in the US, particularly facing queer and trans* people of color, and all people of color.

i just wanted to post that bit to make clear that while i am in this marriage equality book and obviously that issue is important, i think the national conversation has to shift. i just started reading the new jim crow (excerpt linked) by michelle alexander and it’s eye-opening and deeply disturbing. it posits very convincingly that the rise of mass incarceration began around the time of the civil rights movement’s beginnings as an evolution of the same social caste system that has been around since american slavery began. it explains how slavery in america was invented to keep poor whites and blacks from uniting against the rich white planter class. poor whites were offered “racial bribes” in the form of obtaining a higher social caste over poor blacks, so that their fear and anger would be redirected towards blacks and away from the rich. sounds familiar, right?

*than this one posted from lower-res files.

by the way, i know this sounds funny when this comic doesn’t deal with race. the protagonist, R., is Chinese, but i don’t explore white privilege or anything here. if i knew then what i know now, the story would have changed some.

- ed “whitesplaining on the soapbox” choy

“Roosterlegs” is © 2012 Ed Choy and Sam Sharpe.

I bolded the above because, Yes.

believermag:

Interview with Chris Onstad 
Part I.
When Chris Onstad, creator of the award-winning webcomic Achewood, announced an indefinite hiatus in February 2011, readers had little reason to expect a return; like cult favorites Calvin & Hobbes and Bloom County, the strip – and its creator – appeared to have crash-landed right around the ten-year mark.  But, much to our delight, a newly divorced (and employed, now as a food writer at the Portland Mercury) Onstad showed up again in November, logging episodes in a surreal new arc.  The Believer talked with Onstad about Achewood’s evolution, proceeding from two self-selected strips. - Joseph Martin
BLVR: Why did you choose this first strip?
Chris Onstad: I like it because it’s still an example of linear comic form.  It’s not as simple as the initial strips, which were goofy twitches; it’s written to the point where I’d almost call it overwritten.  It’s one of the things I always disliked about the format: everything has to be in a bubble and, if it gets overly wordy, it looks like one of those educational or historical comic strips in the back of the Sunday paper, the kind no one ever likes.
BLVR: Achewood has always been a wordy strip.  I always wondered: Do you consider yourself a cartoonist?  Would that be your self-description?
CO: I like to use “writer/cartoonist.”  Obviously, my passion doesn’t lie in the art.  I use the art to be expressive, but the writing is always the thing I tweak the most.  The art, oftentimes, is something I slapped together at the last minute.  Don’t get me wrong, I really enjoy creating the art sometimes.  But more often, it’s in service of the writing. I’ve actually been really enjoying writing the character blogs.  I tend to go 1,500, 2,000 words with that stuff because, when you get in the zone with writing, you don’t count words or pages.  I just love the flow and the unrestricted freedom of it after focusing ideas into panels for so long.
BLVR: You’ve explicitly admitted to a Chris Ware influence, though.  It seems like comics are something you come from.
CO: But he’s like the only guy I read.  I’m the worst-versed comics person in comics.  I only know me and Chris Ware.  I probably draw from an influence of four or five guys that I really like.  I don’t like reading comics for the most part because, as a fellow cartoonist, I look and say, “Oh, panel three’s where they took the easy out and four’s a cheap shot and five is rehash of two and six is a shitty ending.”  I look at it too analytically because that’s the game I’m in. 
BLVR: Later on there’s a bizarro version of this strip’s shtick where Teodor’s latent homosexuality becomes a plot point.  What made you go back to that well?
CO: I love the idea of trying to draw out someone’s latent homosexuality, because I see sexuality as a spectrum.  I remember reading Pete Townshend say once, “I’m not gay, but I’ve had those impulses.”  It’s not unthinkable for everyone to be that way, so let’s explore that idea with this character and see what makes him uncomfortable, how close he’ll get to it.  I like putting that tension on [Teodor] because, while he himself is not homosexual, it’s a gray area with humanity.  The tension is something to play with. 

omigawd.

believermag:

Interview with Chris Onstad 

Part I.

When Chris Onstad, creator of the award-winning webcomic Achewood, announced an indefinite hiatus in February 2011, readers had little reason to expect a return; like cult favorites Calvin & Hobbes and Bloom County, the strip – and its creator – appeared to have crash-landed right around the ten-year mark.  But, much to our delight, a newly divorced (and employed, now as a food writer at the Portland Mercury) Onstad showed up again in November, logging episodes in a surreal new arc.  The Believer talked with Onstad about Achewood’s evolution, proceeding from two self-selected strips. - Joseph Martin

BLVR: Why did you choose this first strip?

Chris Onstad: I like it because it’s still an example of linear comic form.  It’s not as simple as the initial strips, which were goofy twitches; it’s written to the point where I’d almost call it overwritten.  It’s one of the things I always disliked about the format: everything has to be in a bubble and, if it gets overly wordy, it looks like one of those educational or historical comic strips in the back of the Sunday paper, the kind no one ever likes.

BLVR: Achewood has always been a wordy strip.  I always wondered: Do you consider yourself a cartoonist?  Would that be your self-description?

CO: I like to use “writer/cartoonist.”  Obviously, my passion doesn’t lie in the art.  I use the art to be expressive, but the writing is always the thing I tweak the most.  The art, oftentimes, is something I slapped together at the last minute.  Don’t get me wrong, I really enjoy creating the art sometimes.  But more often, it’s in service of the writing. I’ve actually been really enjoying writing the character blogs.  I tend to go 1,500, 2,000 words with that stuff because, when you get in the zone with writing, you don’t count words or pages.  I just love the flow and the unrestricted freedom of it after focusing ideas into panels for so long.

BLVR: You’ve explicitly admitted to a Chris Ware influence, though.  It seems like comics are something you come from.

CO: But he’s like the only guy I read.  I’m the worst-versed comics person in comics.  I only know me and Chris Ware.  I probably draw from an influence of four or five guys that I really like.  I don’t like reading comics for the most part because, as a fellow cartoonist, I look and say, “Oh, panel three’s where they took the easy out and four’s a cheap shot and five is rehash of two and six is a shitty ending.”  I look at it too analytically because that’s the game I’m in. 

BLVR: Later on there’s a bizarro version of this strip’s shtick where Teodor’s latent homosexuality becomes a plot point.  What made you go back to that well?

CO: I love the idea of trying to draw out someone’s latent homosexuality, because I see sexuality as a spectrum.  I remember reading Pete Townshend say once, “I’m not gay, but I’ve had those impulses.”  It’s not unthinkable for everyone to be that way, so let’s explore that idea with this character and see what makes him uncomfortable, how close he’ll get to it.  I like putting that tension on [Teodor] because, while he himself is not homosexual, it’s a gray area with humanity.  The tension is something to play with. 

omigawd.

edchoyblog:

so this is deeply silly*, but you can buy a date with me (left), maurice vellekoop, noah van sciver, and other cartoonists at the little heart anthology kickstarter. for mine, you have to be in philadelphia OR in minneapolis in early-mid june. another donation gift includes a 2-color Risograph print by me**.
sam sharpe (who you can also buy a date with) and i made the comic “roosterlegs” (click for preview), about “r.,” a young trans*/genderqueer person and their journey at the library.
little heart will debut at TCAF 2012, where i will table with publisher 2D Cloud and fellow contributor jeremy sorese.
*but i won’t pretend i don’t like putting my mug on the internet
** you can see the digital files, about to be printed, on the kickstarter page, but i’m gonna wait for the print version to put it on tumblr.

<3.
ed choy and sam sharpe are great cartoonists and their comic in this anthology sounds awesome. bookstore people! note the retailer $100 for 10 copies option. everyone: note the date options.

edchoyblog:

so this is deeply silly*, but you can buy a date with me (left), maurice vellekoop, noah van sciver, and other cartoonists at the little heart anthology kickstarter. for mine, you have to be in philadelphia OR in minneapolis in early-mid june. another donation gift includes a 2-color Risograph print by me**.

sam sharpe (who you can also buy a date with) and i made the comic “roosterlegs” (click for preview), about “r.,” a young trans*/genderqueer person and their journey at the library.

little heart will debut at TCAF 2012, where i will table with publisher 2D Cloud and fellow contributor jeremy sorese.

*but i won’t pretend i don’t like putting my mug on the internet

** you can see the digital files, about to be printed, on the kickstarter page, but i’m gonna wait for the print version to put it on tumblr.

<3.

ed choy and sam sharpe are great cartoonists and their comic in this anthology sounds awesome. bookstore people! note the retailer $100 for 10 copies option. everyone: note the date options.

wambamashleyanne:

Queer Comics Project!A show of local LGBTQ comics at SF The Cartoon Art Museum Curated by the Engage: Queer Comics Project class at CCA
Opening party this Saturday, December 17th starting at 5:30PM,featuring performances by Sue Casa, Trangela Lansbury, Karma Zabetch and more 

This sounds great. NYC, I want to produce an event like this. ya herd?
On the real, maybe I can get this rolling at MoCCA&#8230;soooo&#8230;if any comics artists are interested in something like this, let&#8217;s chat. yes plz.

wambamashleyanne:

Queer Comics Project!

A show of local LGBTQ comics at SF The Cartoon Art Museum 
Curated by the Engage: Queer Comics Project class at CCA

Opening party this Saturday, December 17th starting at 5:30PM,
featuring performances by Sue Casa, Trangela Lansbury, Karma Zabetch and more

 

This sounds great. NYC, I want to produce an event like this. ya herd?

On the real, maybe I can get this rolling at MoCCA…soooo…if any comics artists are interested in something like this, let’s chat. yes plz.

(via tierracita)

thenearsightedmonkey:

I was a kid growing up in a troubled household. We didn’t have books in the house but we did have the daily paper and I remember picking out Family Circus before I could really read.

There was something about the life on the other side of that circle that looked pretty good.  For kids like me there was a map and a compass hidden in Family Circus. The parents in that comic strip really loved their children. Their home was stable. It put that image in my head and I kept it.

I’d always heard that great art will cause people to burst into tears but the only time it ever happened to me was when I was introduced to Bil Keane’s son, Jeff.  As soon as I shook his hand I just started bawling my face off because I realized  I had climbed through the circle.

And how I did it was by making pictures and writing stories.

I am so very sad to know Bill Keane has died. To me the Family Circus is my family. They are my soul family in the image world.

That’s why if you say a word against Family Circus to me I will slug you so hard.

Lynda Barry, getting it right on: words, images, pictures of family, and just being so great.

The ever delightful Donation Derby.

The ever delightful Donation Derby.

unequal parts flailing, failing, yelling, and sitting quietly.

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have at it.